Wednesday, April 16, 2008

None Dare Call It Done. And Yet...


I reliably disappointment friends who ask if I’m happy to be done with a book. The thing is, it’s hard to be happy about being done when you don’t know if you are or not, and I almost never do. There’s no strip of tape to break as you cross the finish line, and usually there’s not even a finish line. For weeks after the final (“final”) art is turned over to the publisher, you, the editor, the art director, the designer, and the copyeditor are still looking for and catching things that might need work. (Whether you catch something or not, just the knowledge that you and others are looking manages to strip a lot of the sheen from the idea of the big finish.) Even weeks later, after the first proofs have come back from the printer, straggling problems may reveal themselves. So it’s good news here that Moonshot has now been through all, or at least most, of that. The proofs are reviewed, tweaked, corrected, patched, and amended, and shortly on their way back to the printer. There are worlds of work left for the publisher, Atheneum, but as far as mine own part is concerned, well, not until I have the bound book in my hands will I call it done, but as they say at NASA: the vehicle is through the region of maximum dynamic pressure!

3 comments:

Eric Orchard said...

Great image.It'll be an amazing book and inspire a ton of kids, I'm sure.

matt said...

The Region of Maximum Dynamic Pressure...that's perfect. Looking forward to the book, Brian. Take at least the afternoon off.

Brian Floca said...

Thanks for the notes, gentlemen. And the lingo gets even better, Matt. In engineering speak, the shorthand expression for "maximum dynamic pressure" is "max Q." I tried to work that in to the original post but it felt a little forced, so thanks for the excuse to revisit the topic. Also, it's already the name of a band, so don't even think about it.